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What studies and at what age should women in the USA take it?

'27.01.2022'

Source: Consumer Reports

A woman wants to stay young, healthy and beautiful at any age. But independently, at the level of sensations or by reflection in the mirror, it is impossible to objectively control the state of the organism.

Photo: Shutterstock

Therefore, it is very important to systematically, throughout your life, undergo key examinations, get vaccinated and timely identify potential risks in order to successfully reduce them, writes Consumer Reports. What do we do?

Between 20 and 30 for years

  • Vaccination:

flu vaccine (Flu shot), Every year;
tetanus vaccination (Tetanus booster), every 10 years;
pertussis vaccination (Whooping cough, in the combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-TdaP vaccine) if you are not sure if you have had it at least once in your teens or earlier;
human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine if you are younger than 26 years and have not done it yet.

  • Screening and screening

Cervical cancer: Starting at 21, pass the PAP test (Pap smear) every three years. After thirty years, you can take a PAP test every 5 years if you test for papillomavirus every time.
Sexually transmitted diseases: if you are under 25 years old and you are sexually active, take the annual screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Take an HIV test at least once.
Blood pressure: check it at least once every two years.
Cholesterol: If you have high blood pressure, hereditary heart disease, or a high risk of developing a cardiovascular disease, take a blood test for cholesterol in 35 years, and then every 3-5 years, depending on the results.
2 diabetes type: if you are overweight or obese, have a family history of diabetes, have high blood pressure or cholesterol, take an fasting blood glucose test and HbA1c test to monitor changes in blood sugar (every 3 of the year depending on the results).

  • Talk with your doctor

Choice of contraception
Diet, exercise and sleep
Smoking, alcohol and psychoactive substances

  • Useful Tips

Keep in mind that how you feel about your health now will affect your future. “What we put into our bodies affects our long-term health, how we look, feel, 10 years, 20 years, 30 years and beyond,” says Barbara Levy, MD, vice president in Health Policy of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Levitt believes that emotional health is also important during these years. For many women, this is the first experience of starting a family or starting a career - all this can lead to serious stress.

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Between 40 and 50 for years

  • Vaccination:

flu vaccine (Flu shot), Every year;
tetanus vaccination (Tetanus booster), every 10 years;
herpes zoster vaccine Shingrix in 50 years.

  • Screening and screening:

Mammary cancer: at age 40, talk to your doctor about when you'll get your first mammogram (for most, it's 50, but if there are risk factors, it may be needed sooner). Mammography is recommended every 2 years for low risk, and annually for high risk.
Cervical cancer: take a PAP test every three years (with a simultaneous analysis for papillomavirus - every five years).
Sexually transmitted diseases: Test for chlamydia and gonorrhea annually if a new partner or partners appears.
Blood pressure: at least once every two years.
Cholesterol: if there are no risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease, take a blood test at age 45. After that, repeat it every three to five years depending on the results.
2 diabetes type: If you are overweight or obese, have a family history of diabetes, high blood pressure or cholesterol, take a fasting blood glucose test and HbA1c test to monitor changes in blood sugar (every 3 of the year depending on the results).
Colon Cancer: at the age of 50 years, talk with your doctor about having a colonoscopy every 10 years, stool analysis every year or sigmoidoscopy every five years, checking the stool every three years, or alternative diagnostics.

  • Talk with your doctor

Choice of contraception
Diet, exercise and sleep
Smoking, alcohol and psychoactive substances

  • Useful Tips

"It's important to remember to use contraception as you go through menopause," says John Cullen, a family physician in Valdez, Alaska, and a board member of the American Academy of Family Physicians. – Talk to your doctor if you experience increasingly painful, heavy, or unpredictable periods as you approach menopause. Many women at this point actually benefit from drugs by controlling these processes.”

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After 60 years and older

  • Vaccination:

flu vaccine (Flu shot), Every year;
tetanus vaccination (Tetanus booster)every 10 years;
herpes zoster vaccine Shingrixif you haven't done it in 50;
two pneumonia vaccines after 65 years. CDC recommends PCV13 (Prevnar) first of all, and a year later - PPSV23 (Pneumovax).

  • Screening and screening

Mammary cancer: keep getting mammograms at least every two years. At age 75, talk to your doctor about whether you need regular mammograms in the future.
Cervical cancer: Most women can stop taking PAP tests in 65 years. Discuss with your doctor whether to continue.
Osteoporosis: Take a bone density test in 65 years and repeat the tests every 2-3 years. If you are at risk (family history, low body weight, smoking, thyroid disease, early or surgical menopause, history of prednisone, or a history of fractures), you may need to be examined earlier.
Sexually transmitted diseases: Test for chlamydia and gonorrhea annually if a new partner or partners appears.
Blood pressure: check at least once every two years.
Cholesterol: take a blood test for cholesterol every three to five years, depending on the results.
2 diabetes type: if you are overweight or obese, have a family history of diabetes, high blood pressure or cholesterol, have an fasting glucose test and an HbA1c test to monitor blood sugar changes (every 3 of the year, depending on the results).
Colon Cancer: continue to do a colonoscopy every 10 years, a stool test every year, or a sigmoidoscopy every five years with a stool check every three years. There are other diagnostic options - discuss with your doctor. Screenings can be discontinued at age 75.

  • Talk with your doctor

Choice of contraception
Diet, exercise and sleep
Smoking, alcohol and psychoactive substances

  • Useful Tips

“Chronic conditions like arthritis and diabetes can become more difficult at this age,” Levy says, “and some daily activities can become more difficult.” It is very important to focus on maintaining muscle mass through strengthening exercises. Squats, push-ups, and arm raises are good advice.

It is also important to take care of your sexual health, especially if you have more than one or a new partner. Some men may not want to use condoms because there is no chance of pregnancy, but the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases remains, the expert emphasizes.

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